14 Dec 2015 @ 12:58 AM 
 

Mountain Hardwear Phantom 45 ultra-lightweight down sleeping bag

 
Mountain Hardwear Phantom 45 ultra-lightweight down sleeping bag


Mountain Hardwear Phantom 45 ultra-lightweight down sleeping bag


Sit a spell, take your shoes off.. He Who Dies With The Most Toys Wins. I may not have both oars in the water, but I’m willing to use any means at my disposal to help you fill your toy box [without draining your wallet dry in the process]. To encourage sales, I routinely offer discounts of up to 25%. While my initial asking price is generally somewhat higher than what you would expect to pay at a yard sale, when the cupboard is bare, I will offer rock-bottom discounts on selected items. In any event, if you send me a reasonable offer I will dial the price down a notch to put a meal on the table; to put a dab of S on my SOS. Marketed as an ultra-lightweight bag with features found on a standard basic-issue three-season design, the one-pound Phantom was designed for reasonably mild conditions. This premium-grade bag is insulated with the best of the best, 800-fill power down. Note- I do not have a stuff sack for this bag. If you’re looking for a bag tailor-made for a small-framed individual this bag is the perfect choice. The size is a short; a size that is a mite difficult to find. The review is available online. The Phantom 45D is a fully featured lightweight bag with a down baffle in the hood and neck, and a down-filled zipper draft tube. Its half-length zipper opens from the top. These features make it the Cadillac of sleeping bags, but nudge its weight to just over a pound. The Phantom 45D is conservatively rated to 45 degrees. Two testers (wearing light layers) used the model comfortably in a snow cave, while others used it during a blizzard on Mount Rainier. Despite the bags durable water-repellent (DWR) treatment, in heavy dew you should use a bivy sack or tent. The Phantom 45D is a medium mummy, wide enough for light layering, but not so wide as to create heat-robbing air pockets. This bag is a good choice for people who want the features of a heavier, more expensive bag in a lightweight, inexpensive model. Recommended Use: Alpine bivies and camping from 35 to 60 degrees. With layers you can take it down to freezing. Gear that has seen its fair share of wear and tear is my stock-in-trade; more often than not, the item will have minor condition issues of the cosmetic variety. O avoid getting on my wrong side, I’m thinking you should spend your nickels and dimes somewhere else. As it is, this cantankerous old goat already has enough of your kind on his naughty list. Flaws and imperfections are one thing, structural defects, on the other hand, are an altogether different matter- I don’t sell shoddy, hulled-out merchandise. Imbued with a pleasant disposition and the ability to communicate with people in a friendly manner. T he Grinch is a. Ogre with an aversion to roast beast, who pudding and effete nitpickers who fuss over insignificant concerns. I should be able to answer any question you may have. Over the years, I’ve accumulated a lot of information, information that I’m willing to share. I reserve the right to apply higher rates to orders being sent to other locations, so please contact me prior to placing your order to make arrangements. The east ridge tent emporium. While this endeavor is, for all intents and purposes, a glorified hobby that strayed off course, the selection of vintage merchandise in my shop is the end result of an acquisition process based on several decades of research. Since I don’t consider weight, in and of itself, to be a factor of significance in the selection process, I can focus my attention on issues related to build quality. Truth is, over the years, this poor wayfaring vagabond has come to appreciate the traits and attributes, the benefits and drawbacks, of rugged, old school gear; gear purpose-built to bear the strain of prolonged exposure to conditions of the somewhat inhospitable variety. I made a wrong turn at Albuquerque, so this rough draft is as far as my ill-conceived essay got before I ran out of steam.. A STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE TO COLLECTING VINTAGE TENTS. Prefatory Remarks: This guide was written to provide the serious collector with detailed information. Information that is by its very nature rather bland. Hamburger Helper was created to make ground beef more palatable; this guide is designed to serve the same basic purpose. A-frames and Tipis: Obsolescent Tent Design, An Introduction to the Fundamental Aspects of. While I have nothing but respect for the fine free-standing and self-supporting tents that folks like Jansport and Moss were building back in the day, there were some other truly exceptional designs on the market back in the 70s. The vast majority of those designs were A-frames. Obtaining information related to old school gear is, by and large, a tad difficult, so knowing where to cast your net is the key to understanding the fundamental aspects of tent design. While from time to time you might stumble across an interesting tidbit online, the best source of detailed information is a dissertation that was cobbled together back in the mid-70s by William Kemsley. As you might expect, given the age of the publication, external-frame packs are cast in the lead role. 35 of the 285 pages are allocated to near about every aspect of the subject. Note: Collectors of Gregory packs will need to look elsewhere for data. The company was founded in 1977; the same year the Guide was published. The Guide devotes three chapters, 57 pages, to tent-related material. While traditional A-frames account for the majority of the 124 shelters evaluated, the selection is enough to put Baskin-Robbins to shame. The line up includes flavors from Gerry, Holubar and Trailwise; from REI, Sierra Designs and The North Face; Early Winters, Snow Lion and MSR. If you’re at all familiar with tents, and if you’re reading this I will assume you are, you couldn’t help but notice that a very big name was left out of the line up. Just as no history of ice cream would be complete without the inclusion of a reference to vanilla, Eureka’s exclusion from the Guide would be akin to writing a history of the auto industry that omitted Ford. Eureka deserves a place at the table, a place at the head of the table. Only one design featured in the Guide is still alive and kicking- the Eureka Timberline. The Eureka Timberline is a fossil of the self-tensioning A-frame variety. Back in the day, the self-tensioning A-frame was an innovative, state-of-the art design. Other examples of the type, like the compact Trailwise Fitzroy and the sub-compact Rivendell Bombshelter, were phased out of production decades ago. Marmot was around back then, but they were building sleeping bags; single-wall shelters like the Taku came along later. At the other end of the size spectrum, the Guide includes a base camp of the rudimentary, single-pole tipi variety that deserves some serious respect, the REI Mt McKinley, and a Sierra Designs tipi that can best be described as a work of art, the 3-Man Family Tripod. Neither fish, nor fowl, part A-frame, part tipi, the Tripod’s little brother, the Starflight, was downright peculiar. But, no where near as peculiar as the Oval Intension; a six-pole, North Face design that was the end result of a study in advanced, geodesic engineering. For all intents and purposes, the Mt McKinley is the civilian equivalent of the M-1950 5-man arctic tent. Its not an exact match, but its close enough and, more importantly, a whole lot easier to haul up the side of a mountain. Everest climbers praised the design. The twelve-pound, four-man tipi was used as a base camp shelter on several expeditions. Cabela’s Outback Lodge is a single-wall, outfitter-grade variation of the same basic design. A gnat in the ointment: Given the overall value of the work, it may not be an issue of any great concern, but for some odd reason, a truly exceptional 3-man tipi from The North Face was edited out of the Guide. To omit some ordinary, run-of-the-mill design that doesn’t merit attention is one thing; to discard a gem is an altogether different matter. In any event, the aforementioned tipi is featured in the Fall 1975 edition of The North Face catalog; a catalog which is available online. Let me explain: In the April 1977 issue of Backpacker (aka Backpacker #20), an evaluation of the Dandelion appeared in a gear review entitled Under the Big Top. Lo and behold, a few months later, Under the Big Top was repurposed, minus the Dandelion evaluation, as a chapter in the Guide. Exhibit-A: Sierra Designs Starflight. This review is a thumbnail sketch based on my evaluation of the design. Truth be told, my initial impression was not altogether favorable. In addition to being a wee bit more than just a tad peculiar in a general sort of way, the 34-square foot Starflight has proven to be an odd duck in several other respects. The Starflight is not your standard basic-issue two-man tent. THE UNCOLA: Park the Starflight next to a standard basic-issue pup tent and the unorthodox nature of the design is rather obvious. Tailor-made for the seasoned backcountry explorer who marches to the beat of another drum, this pint-sized, four-pound tipi may very well be the ideal shelter for the wilderness camper who is looking for a minimalistic retreat that resonates with a certain intangible quality. A quality that, much like a breaded loin of the elephant ear variety with rings and a pint, is best described as an acquired taste with addictive properties. Despite its outdated, bygone-era appearance, the Starflight tipi is a sound design with features that contemporary designers, like Judy Gross of LightHeart Gear, have incorporated into their ultra-lightweight shelters. With 55 inches of elbow-room, the 30-square foot LH SoLong 6 is a two-pound, three-season shelter that has drawn some favorable reviews. So, how does George Jetson stack up against Fred Flintstone. Peak height: 45 vs 52. Side walls: 8 vs 13. Max width: 55 vs 64. Min width: 30 vs 42. Length: 100 vs 98. As I see it, the LightHeart design merits respect. Aside from weight, the most significant difference between the two is the amount of mesh. To say anything more would be… About the author: Awarded an advanced degree in jackalope studies for his research into the origins of mud, the distinguished scholar who wrote this introductory discourse is not, as some evidence would seem to suggest, an arrogant, foul-tempered troll with a contrary disposition. Trolls [dysfunctionous reclusi] live under bridges; the author lives down by the river in a van with a stray. In any event, it has been my pleasure to provide you with this presentation. You don’t have to go home, but you can’t stay here. The item “Mountain Hardwear Phantom 45 ultra-lightweight down sleeping bag” is in sale since Friday, November 27, 2015. This item is in the category “Sporting Goods\Outdoor Sports\Camping & Hiking\Outdoor Sleeping Gear\Sleeping Bags”. The seller is “ridge961″ and is located in Angleton, Texas. This item can be shipped to United States, to Canada, to United Kingdom, DK, RO, SK, BG, CZ, FI, HU, LV, LT, MT, EE, to Australia, GR, PT, CY, SI, to Japan, to China, SE, KR, ID, to Taiwan, TH, to Belgium, to France, to Hong Kong, to Ireland, to Netherlands, PL, to Spain, to Italy, to Germany, to Austria, RU, IL, to Mexico, to New Zealand, PH, SG, to Switzerland, NO, SA, UA, AE, QA, KW, BH, HR, MY, CL, CO, CR, PA, TT, GT, HN, JM.

  • Season: Warm Weather (+32F & above)
  • Insulation Type: Down
  • Brand: Mountain Hardwear

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Posted By: admin
Last Edit: 14 Dec 2015 @ 12 58 AM

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